Please note that some translations using Google Translate may not be accurately represented and downloaded documents cannot be translated. Dana-Farber and the Jimmy Fund assume no liability for inaccuracies that may result from using this third-party tool, which is for website translation.
Please note that some translations using Google Translate may not be accurately represented and downloaded documents cannot be translated. Dana-Farber and the Jimmy Fund assume no liability for inaccuracies that may result from using this third-party tool, which is for website translation.

Planned gift in honor of late husband will help patients access care

Theresa Kennedy gives annually to support multiple myeloma research and has included a gift to Dana-Farber in her estate plans in honor of her late husband, Ken Packard.

Spring 2024
By Alison Krawczyk

As a nurse in Boston, Theresa Kennedy knew of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute’s impeccable reputation for patient care. However, when her late husband, Ken Packard, was diagnosed with multiple myeloma and treated at Dana-Farber, the compassion and kindness they received far exceeded their expectations. “Almost to a fault, everyone we encountered was so kind and on top of everything,” said Kennedy. “We always felt like they were taking care of their own family member.”

During his treatment with Jacob Laubach, MD, MPP, chief of the Division of Multiple Myeloma, and Ginger Dalton, MS, APRN, Packard came to enjoy his visits and talking with them about his passion—pizza—and the book he was writing on the subject. In memory of Packard, Kennedy gives annually to support Laubach’s multiple myeloma research.

Additionally, Kennedy included a gift of $200,000 to Dana-Farber in her estate plans through her individual retirement account (IRA) to support the Patient Assistance Fund, which helps patients who don’t have the ability to pay for their health care or associated costs. “I don’t have an estate that can build a building, but we had an incredible social worker who helped us navigate the cancer experience,” said Kennedy. “It’s tragic when people can’t get good care because they can’t access it. I hope this gift will help.”

“We always felt like they were taking care of their own family member.”

Theresa Kennedy
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