Please note that some translations using Google Translate may not be accurately represented and downloaded documents cannot be translated. Dana-Farber and the Jimmy Fund assume no liability for inaccuracies that may result from using this third-party tool, which is for website translation.
Please note that some translations using Google Translate may not be accurately represented and downloaded documents cannot be translated. Dana-Farber and the Jimmy Fund assume no liability for inaccuracies that may result from using this third-party tool, which is for website translation.

Patricia Farah’s legacy continues through support for cancer research

Alan D’Andrea, MD, and Ursula Matulonis, MD, collaborate on research to advance treatment for breast and gynecologic cancers.

Spring 2024
By Shannon Watterson
Photography by Sam Ogden

Patricia Farah’s driving motivation was always to make an impact. This was clear to her husband, Alfred, who predeceased her, and to her long-time financial advisor, Jay Lupica, who recently made a $500,000 gift from Patricia’s estate in support of the Patricia W. and Alfred E. Farah Borderline and Low-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer Research Fund and the Patricia W. and Alfred E. Farrah International Term Fellowship, both at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

Prior to her death in 2011, Patricia was charitably inclined, and wanted her dollars to continue to make an impact after she passed—both in Naples, Florida, where she and Alfred lived for the later part of their lives, and in their home of New England.

“Patricia knew research was a big piece of the puzzle to improving people’s lives,” said Lupica. When he heard about the research going on in Dana-Farber’s Susan F. Smith Center for Women’s Cancers, led by Ursula Matulonis, MD, chief of the Division of Gynecologic Oncology and the Brock-Wilson Family Chair at Dana-Farber, he knew these were the kinds of projects Patricia would be interested in: in-depth investigations at a world-class institution, where her money would make a big impact and have outsized benefits for patients, if successful.  

“Patricia knew research was a big piece of the puzzle to improving people’s lives.”

Jay Lupica

Patricia’s legacy also makes an impact through the Patricia W. and Alfred E. Farrah International Term Fellowship, led by Alan D’Andrea, MD, director of the Susan F. Smith Center for Women’s Cancers and of the Center for DNA Damage and Repair, who is training the next generation of researchers who are already making a material difference in patients’ lives.

“Patricia was very interested in helping women and children,” Lupica explains. “I feel it is my responsibility to carry on her goals, and these projects that Ursula and Alan are leading are exactly what she should have enjoyed supporting, were she alive.”

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