Please note that some translations using Google Translate may not be accurately represented and downloaded documents cannot be translated. Dana-Farber and the Jimmy Fund assume no liability for inaccuracies that may result from using this third-party tool, which is for website translation.
Please note that some translations using Google Translate may not be accurately represented and downloaded documents cannot be translated. Dana-Farber and the Jimmy Fund assume no liability for inaccuracies that may result from using this third-party tool, which is for website translation.

Feenys invest in new treatments for advanced prostate cancer

Chuck and Jan Feeny
Chuck and Jan Feeny are supporting prostate cancer research at Dana-Farber.

Late Fall 2022
By Colleen Sullivan
Photo courtesy of Chuck Feeny

In his 12 years as a prostate cancer patient, Chuck Feeny has learned quite a lot about the disease and how to navigate it. He takes each day in stride, every setback, every bit of good news and bad. And he has experienced quite a bit of each.

In 2020, Feeny went to his local hospital on Cape Cod for a routine appointment, but this time, his oncologist advised him that he needed to be seen by an expert in advanced, treatment-resistant prostate cancer, someone who you go to when all else fails. He referred him to Atish Choudhury, MD, PhD, chief of the Arthur and Linda Gelb Center for Translational Research at Dana-Farber.

Devastating as this news was, Feeny was put somewhat at ease during his very first telehealth appointment with Choudhury. “He immediately impressed me,” Feeny said. “I’ve never even met him face-to-face—the compassion and chemistry was still there.”

What further impressed Feeny was Choudhury’s cutting-edge research. Inspired and eager to give back, Feeny and his wife, Jan, have pledged a generous gift of $500,000 to Choudhury’s efforts to develop novel therapeutic strategies for prostate cancer.

Using a biobank of more than 8,000 patient-derived specimens, Choudhury and his team are working to sequence DNA that circulates in the blood of patients with advanced prostate cancer, which will enable them to identify treatment responses much more quickly than previous methods. This is especially critical for patients whose cancer has become treatment-resistant, and allows for a more personalized treatment plan for each individual patient.

“Dr. Choudhury has provided me with such inspiration about the future,” said Feeny. “And the more we learned about him and his work, the more we knew we wanted to support the research.”

“Chuck and Jan’s support is enabling faster progress in prostate cancer research,” said Choudhury. “With this funding, we aim to learn more about which patients are most likely to respond to new treatment approaches, especially those who have exhausted all other options. We’re grateful to have received this investment in our work.”

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